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Texas A&M branching out in Israel? - The Eagle: News

Texas A&M branching out in Israel?

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Posted: Friday, October 11, 2013 12:00 am | Updated: 5:08 pm, Tue Oct 15, 2013.

Texas A&M University is close to creating a branch campus in Israel, sources close to the situation tell The Eagle.

High-ranking A&M System and university administrators recently have made trips to the country to negotiate the partnership, according to the sources, who spoke on condition of anonymity. They said the initiative has not been finalized but that an announcement is tentatively scheduled for Oct. 23. They say A&M System Chancellor John Sharp, who has been steering the effort, has a serious interest in a second physical presence for A&M in the Middle East.

It's unclear if the potential branch campus would offer a range of A&M degrees, or focus on a specific discipline. It is also unclear how the initiative would be funded.

The sources said Sharp, A&M Provost Karan Watson and Rabbi Peter Tarlow, former executive director of the A&M Hillel and a tourism expert, have traveled to Israel to work on the initiative. It's unclear how much A&M or the A&M System have spent on the venture thus far. The Eagle has filed an open records request to obtain travel records, expense reports, itinerary and schedules of the visitors. So far, the requests made to A&M will cost the newspaper $300 for officials to compile.

A system spokesman declined to comment for the story, as did Sharp. A spokesperson for The Council for Higher Education in Israel did not return a request for comment.

Sharp on Wednesday spoke at a fundraiser hosted by the Jewish National Fund in Austin, where it was reported by the American-Statesman that his flagship university is working on a collaboration with Israel, and that he expected to make a major announcement in about two weeks. Sharp said the announcement will involve Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and President Shimon Peres. No mention of a branch campus was made in the article.

Julie Malin, regional director for the Jewish National Fund, said that Sharp visited the group of 160 to raise money, but declined further comment.

The announcement teased by Sharp syncs up with a Middle East trip expected to be made by one of the more well-known Aggies in politics -- Gov. Rick Perry. Later this month, Perry will travel to Israel, according to his spokesman Josh Havens. Perry broke the news of his Israel trip in July to The Washington Times. He told the paper, "We will be going to Israel to bring together Arabs, Christian and Jews in an educational forum."

Havens on Wednesday declined to comment on the nature of Perry's trip.

Texas A&M's first Mid-East campus

An Israeli campus would be more than 7,000 miles from College Station, but just over 1,000 miles from Texas A&M University at Qatar. The Qatar campus was founded in 2003 as part of "Education City" and is subsidized by the government-funded Qatar Foundation. The campus offers four degrees in engineering and educates 550 students from primarily Middle Eastern countries. The engineering students are required to take the same core classes as their Texan counterparts, and the majority of the faculty members at A&M Qatar are transplants from College Station.

Texas A&M's only other branch campus is located in Galveston and specializes in marine and maritime studies in science, engineering and business. Comparatively, the University of Texas has no branch campuses.

An A&M campus in Israel would buck several higher education trends.

Only about a dozen international branch campus are opened per year worldwide, said Jason Lane, director of educational studies at the Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government, the public policy think-tank of the State University of New York.

The growth of international branch campuses is down after an explosion in the early 2000s, and most of the new campuses are located in Southeast Asia, as opposed to the Middle East. There are only about 200 international branch campuses in the world, he said on Tuesday, and only about 90 of those are from American universities.

He said it's rare for a university to operate branch campuses in more than one country.

"A lot of universities realize how difficult it is to manage these things," said Lane, an associate professor who also co-directs the Cross-Border Education Research Team at the University of Albany. "It's evolving the university into a multinational corporation. I refer to them as multinational universities now, because you're managing across geopolitical lines. There are a lot of similarities here in terms of governance, financing, administration and regulatory issues that multinational corporations deal with. I think that's why, once you open one, you realize how difficult it actually is, and they tend to be more hesitant to expanding."

Lane said there are three main reasons why universities expand overseas -- reputation, perceived financial gain and educational value. He said universities finance branch campuses in a variety of ways, but that most of the self-supporting campuses do not make money. Potential pitfalls for the campuses, he said, include regulatory changes in the host country, lack of support from home campus and a disconnect from students culturally, by learning styles or a language barrier.

Most universities hope the branch campuses are revenue generators, but, Lane said, that often isn't the case outside of highly subsidized models.

"I think most universities enter this space thinking these are going to be self-sustaining entities and that they don't want capital or other financial resources from the home campus flowing to the branch; in fact, they want the opposite," Lane said. "I think the reality for most universities is if they are having to drain off the main campus, they are more likely to close the branch campus than sustain it."

Goal for the campus

If Texas A&M were to offer degrees in another foreign country, it would likely need minimal approval from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, said spokesman Dominic Chavez. Chavez said only new programs that utilize Texas students or tax dollars need in-depth board review. He said if A&M were to offer its College Station programs abroad to Texas students, the board would have a procedural review to ensure the educational quality is the same as that offered at the home campus. Due to Texas legislation passed earlier this year, the board would not need to approve any construction financing, Chavez said.

Christopher Morphew, an educational policy professor at the University of Iowa, said an increased international presence could be a way for A&M to raise its worldwide prestige.

"I think A&M probably doesn't like where it sits internationally," Morphew said on Wednesday. "I think some of that may be a function of the fact its in-state competitor does better on these international rankings and this is a way to boost its stature ... But there's not been a ton of work that demonstrates to me that a significant financial investment in something like a branch campus is going to pay-off in international stature and rankings. I haven't read anything that demonstrates that."

Michael McLendon, professor of higher education policy at Southern Methodist University, said on Tuesday that overseas expansions typically result in three main concerns for faculty members. He said sometimes professors will have moral or philosophical qualms about human rights in the host country, concerns about financial or other resources being diverted abroad and that they typically want the university to involve faculty in the decision-making process.

Texas A&M Faculty Senate Speaker Walter Daugherity said Wednesday that no official input was requested from the faculty senate regarding Israel.

Israel is a politically sensitive topic, especially in academia.

Academics internationally have boycotted Israel and continue to do so in the hopes of forcing a change in Israel's policies toward Palestine, which critics argue are oppressive. In May, physicist Stephen Hawking joined a growing list of public figures when he boycotted a conference in Israel. The U.S. Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel advocates professors refrain from any academic cooperation or joint projects with Israeli institutions.

The U.S. Department of State issued a travel warning for Israel, the West Bank and Gaza in December and modified the warning in June. The warning breaks down concerns across the different regions in Israel and labels the country's security environment as complex.

But if there is a university that could garner the support needed to weather international concerns, it would be Texas A&M, experts said.

"The reality is A&M is different from many other public and private universities in this country, in terms of it's a very conservative place," Morphew said. "Its board is now dominated by Rick Perry appointees, and I don't know exactly what his ideas are on Israel, but I seem to remember him having some real strong words of support for Israel in his last attempt at a presidential nomination. If you were to say to me which public research university in the country is in the best position to set up shop in Israel and to not get a huge backlash from its governing structure or its community, A&M would be near the top of that list."

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Welcome to the discussion.

65 comments:

  • master of disaster posted at 7:59 am on Thu, Oct 17, 2013.

    master of disaster Posts: 374

    It looks like a bad idea, and 64% of Eagle readers agree.

     
  • Sweet Dreams posted at 2:35 am on Thu, Oct 17, 2013.

    Sweet Dreams Posts: 31

    You fool.

     
  • Sweet Dreams posted at 2:34 am on Thu, Oct 17, 2013.

    Sweet Dreams Posts: 31

    How awesome! I will root for an Israeli campus! Go TAMU!

     
  • citizen1 posted at 5:40 pm on Mon, Oct 14, 2013.

    citizen1 Posts: 210

    http://videocafe.crooksandliars.com/david/cruz-gods-role-shutdown-his-will-be-done-it-

    Example of Texas Christians leaders evoking magic in place of policy

     
  • citizen1 posted at 7:44 am on Mon, Oct 14, 2013.

    citizen1 Posts: 210

    That escalated quickly didn't it…? Let’s not get distracted from the real issue. The evangelical Christians who run the A&M system have interests in Israel more focused on invisible sky spirits than higher education. It is no way to run a university.

     
  • Sabio posted at 7:10 am on Mon, Oct 14, 2013.

    Sabio Posts: 1228

    Who's Brad?

     
  • txswinner posted at 10:00 pm on Sun, Oct 13, 2013.

    txswinner Posts: 23

    OK Brad, we'll be waiting for the university-wide computer audit that will surely follow your emails to all these people.

     
  • obasfirst posted at 8:57 pm on Sun, Oct 13, 2013.

    obasfirst Posts: 556

    maybe you should send all of them an email.

    Still didn't answer that question; what is considered taxpayer time? When am I on the clock?


     
  • obasfirst posted at 8:54 pm on Sun, Oct 13, 2013.

    obasfirst Posts: 556

    nice try?
    You claimed, that 12 month salary is all paid using tax money:

    Quoting Sabio:
    "Faculty are on 9 month contracts, 100% of which is paid for with taxpayer dollars. ... , it's because of either a private gift which supplements his salary, or through research grants (again, taxpayer money). So, for ALL faculty, their salaries are paid for with taxpayer money."

    I just pointed out a number of other funding sources (contributing to a huge part of total funding btw) that are not from tax money. It's not my problem if you don't understand that.

    Regarding the VAST majority. A huge part of overhead going to TEES is non government, that money is used by TEES for a number of things, including paying salary.


    FYI, the state's contribution is such a small part. How can it pay for the VAST majority of salaries?

     
  • Sabio posted at 7:55 pm on Sun, Oct 13, 2013.

    Sabio Posts: 1228

    obasfirst, and for the record, you posted 6 times between approximately 10:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. on Friday. I'm sure your Department Head, the Dean, the Provost, the President, and the Chancellor would ALL agree that THEY consider you "on the clock", as would, well, every taxpayer in Texas.

     
  • Sabio posted at 7:49 pm on Sun, Oct 13, 2013.

    Sabio Posts: 1228

    Nice try obasfirst. Your base salary, the VAST majority of whatever you are paid, is provided by the taxpayers of Texas. You know it, and I know it. The MOST the other grants can provide is 3 months salary.

    I know EXACTLY what I'm talking about. And you and every other disgruntled faculty member who posts on here knows it too.

    Perhaps Shakespeare said it best in Hamlet, "The lady doth protest too much, methinks."

     
  • obasfirst posted at 6:39 pm on Sun, Oct 13, 2013.

    obasfirst Posts: 556

    Industry grants are not tax payer money
    private gifts/grants are not tax payer money
    grants from Qatar is not tax payer money
    grants from KAUST is not tax payer money.
    Conclusion: you have no clue what you are talking about. That's a fact.

    first you have to establish what is TAX PAYER time?

    regarding your world class institution:http://www.shanghairanking.com/World-University-Rankings/Texas-AM-University---College-Station.html

     
  • obasfirst posted at 6:30 pm on Sun, Oct 13, 2013.

    obasfirst Posts: 556

    nothing wrong with my reading skills.

    You on the other hand have serious reading comprehension problems. You stated that he was not " using State - TAXPAYER - provided equipment properly," All equipment is bought using grant money (either federal grants of industry grants).

    I wouldn't call my comments flaming, my comments are in general backed with numbers, facts, or common sense reasoning.

    Like I said before, when am I on the tax payer clock? It seems you don't realize it's not a 9-5 job. How about weekends, or after 5?

    How do you know my salary, all of it, is paid for by the TAXPAYER. Another assumption. Do you know who pays my salary in the summer? Maybe it's from industry grants, or from Qatar money, or maybe from Kaust? You really should try to think before posting. Besides that, where does research overhead from these entities flow to? Might they be used to pay salary too?

    It's a free country, you can send email to whoever you want. I'm not sure why you would send mail to those two politicians though. We already established that most money is coming from FEDERAL and INDUSTRY grants.

    Where did I say my salary is not paid by the tax payer? Another example of your reading comprehension issues. I said that that the amount of money generated by faculty (through grant overhead) is larger than the amount of salary they are getting. That's completely different.

     
  • Sabio posted at 5:15 pm on Sun, Oct 13, 2013.

    Sabio Posts: 1228

    txswinner, feel free. Since I don't have a boss, I'm curious to whom you'll send the email. As to the response you'd get to the email you plan to send to them, I don't really think they care about improving the ties between athletics and the likes of you and your ilk who constantly complain about athletics. The 12th Man only cares about those who SUPPORT athletics, not belittle them and declare that they have no place at an institution of higher education.

    obasfirst, you'd do well to read more closely. The accusation by txswinner was that I was "flaming" while on the clock. It wasn't about what piece of equipment on which I "flame", but rather the time of day in which I do it. You tried to obfuscate the FACT that YOU post "flame" emails while on the TAXPAYER CLOCK! Your salary, all of it, is paid for by the TAXPAYER.

    THIS taxpayer is not happy that rather than advancing the body of knowledge with taxpayer money, you are posting on here, responding to someone you believe to be "clueless".

    Yep, the Chancellor, as well as Sen. Seliger and Rep. Branch, Chairs of the Senate and House committees on Higher Education will be getting an email now. I'm sure THEY'LL be surprised to learn of your behavior, and equally surprised that you don't think your salaries are paid by the taxpayer.

     
  • Sabio posted at 5:04 pm on Sun, Oct 13, 2013.

    Sabio Posts: 1228

    Actually, masterofdisaster is incorrect. Faculty are on 9 month contracts, 100% of which is paid for with taxpayer dollars. If, and I do say IF, he is paid 12 months (which I doubt given his erroneous statement about how he's paid) , it's because of either a private gift which supplements his salary, or through research grants (again, taxpayer money).

    So, for ALL faculty, their salaries are paid for with taxpayer money. So, his time is TAXPAYER time.

    That is a fact.

    Also fact is that faculty referenced in my post routinely post on this page while on TAXPAYER time.

    Who's living in fantasy land again?!?

    Texas A&M is currently a world class university, and will continue to improve. It won't improve with faculty posting on websites during working hours. I'm thinking more seriously about sending an email to John Sharp with this thread as an attachment!

     
  • txswinner posted at 3:21 pm on Sun, Oct 13, 2013.

    txswinner Posts: 23

    Go ahead Sabio. Email the Chancellor and ask him to audit all faculty computers. And I'll email your boss and ask him how he feels about one of his employees spending a good part of his day flaming and spamming local news boards. That, I bet, is good citizenship for a small private company that depends on local good will and connections. And then I can email the 12th Man and ask them how they intend to increase ties between academics and athletics when one of their "ambassadors" is roaming the local media, constantly trying to needle faculty and sow dissension. I bet that they will really like the job you are doing in preparation for the Vanderbilt game, and the festivities that are supposed to recognize the integration of academics and athletics.

     
  • obasfirst posted at 11:53 am on Sun, Oct 13, 2013.

    obasfirst Posts: 556

    you really are CLUELESS. That computer equipment is paid for by research grants, not by tax money.

    Besides that, many faculty (especially in engineering) give back more to the university in the form of research grants overhead than the nine months of salary they get paid.

    Starting next year, faculty even has to start paying rent for the lab space they have.

    What taxpayer clock would that be? When I work on Saturday or Sunday, or at 2am in the morning, am I still on the taxpayer's clock?

     
  • Sabio posted at 8:28 am on Sun, Oct 13, 2013.

    Sabio Posts: 1228

    txswinner, Ah.....the entertainment continues. First, what makes you think I work for the 12th Man? For the record, I don't. Also, what makes you think I have BOSS? For the record, I don't.

    So, perhaps the question should be pointed back at you. How do you think the TAXPAYERS OF TEXAS WHO PAY YOUR SALARY, feel about you posting on the Eagle website while you're on THEIR clock?!? You did it TWICE in this thread alone!

    This taxpayer isn't happy. Perhaps I'll shoot an email to Sharp to audit computer use by faculty to see who is using State - TAXPAYER - provided equipment properly, and who is not. That would include you, elf, masterofdisaster, obasfirst, etc. ALL TAXPAYER paid faculty who post while on the TAXPAYER clock.

     
  • roy g posted at 9:23 pm on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    roy g Posts: 608

    Wow - Compass is also gotta love this deal if it goes through. [wink]

     
  • roy g posted at 9:20 pm on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    roy g Posts: 608

    Sounds almost like Texas if the political winds don't change anytime in the future.

     
  • roy g posted at 9:16 pm on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    roy g Posts: 608

    What leads anyone to believe the allknowing one is even a member of faculty to begin with?

     
  • roy g posted at 9:13 pm on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    roy g Posts: 608

    How about just the anti-Sabio crowd?

     
  • txswinner posted at 6:53 pm on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    txswinner Posts: 23

    This collaboration with Israel could be a great boon to the university. It's possible that money would be flowing out in such a deal, but the prestige this venture would bring is substantial. It's true Israel does not need help with their educational institutions, but we can benefit by climbing a few (many) notches in the international rankings. Personally I do not care what the motives of each party are in this. As long as faculty is involved in planning, and the crusaders are only wearing their tunics and fantasizing alone behind closed doors, this could all work out.

     
  • txswinner posted at 6:17 pm on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    txswinner Posts: 23

    And, Sabio, let's say that the 12th Man doesn't care what its "ambassadors" are posting online (I highly doubt it, but let's assume away). How is your boss feeling about you flaming the local media 6 to 10 times daily, while on the clock?

     
  • obasfirst posted at 6:04 pm on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    obasfirst Posts: 556

    http://www.usatoday.com/sports/college/schools/finances/

    shows all NCAA finances, when you click on "Texas A&M" it will pop up a window containing finances for the last 8 years, the column school funds is subsidy from the university to the athletics department.

     
  • master of disaster posted at 4:24 pm on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    master of disaster Posts: 374

    Great. Then clean yourself up and get out into the sunshine, little man.

     
  • Rex posted at 4:24 pm on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    Rex Posts: 7

    Where in the budget is this subsidy?

     
  • master of disaster posted at 4:24 pm on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    master of disaster Posts: 374

    What about that post was anti-Israel or even anti-A&M, Sabio?

    Good Lord, you are a sensitive dolt. What happens when someone comments on your work? Do you just burst into flames?

    Seriously, find a hobby.

     
  • Rex posted at 4:18 pm on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    Rex Posts: 7

    TAMU has been in Qatar for years, and all of the funding comes from the Qatar Foundation, which basically IS the royal family. It was a good financial deal for A&M. Now, Israel, on the other hand...

     
  • txswinner posted at 3:28 pm on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    txswinner Posts: 23

    Happy to indulge. Is the 12th Man feeling the same way?

     
  • Sabio posted at 3:06 pm on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    Sabio Posts: 1228

    Thanks for another laugh today!

     
  • txswinner posted at 3:01 pm on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    txswinner Posts: 23

    Quite so. One would think that you are allknowing.

     
  • obasfirst posted at 2:48 pm on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    obasfirst Posts: 556

    using the subsidy they get from the university pretty much every year?

     
  • txswinner posted at 2:40 pm on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    txswinner Posts: 23

    Sabio, this is not behavior befitting an ambassador.

     
  • elf posted at 1:36 pm on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    elf Posts: 1435

    How about using the money to buy new equipment for my laboratory course in a science and agriculture curriculum. Most of the equipment I now have is 24 years old, out of date, obsolete and broken. (I teach over 500 students a year with this equipment.)

     
  • elf posted at 1:31 pm on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    elf Posts: 1435

    Sharp must be reigned in. First, what is Texas doing in Qatar, let alone Israel. How much money is being used from state sources, research overhead, and A&M student tuition to fund these things? Why do we want to spend money this uselessly? There are plenty of other good universities in Israel.

     
  • citizen1 posted at 1:25 pm on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    citizen1 Posts: 210

    It is an oblique reference to the fundamental, evangelical, Christians who run the state of Texas and the A&M system who have interests in Israel independent of branch campuses. During his campaign, In 2011 Perry said, “As a Christian, I have a clear directive to support Israel.” His move to increase ties with Israel has more to do with imaginary stories of ‘end times’, God’s chosen people, and the return of baby Jesus than it does to higher education.

     
  • Rex posted at 1:10 pm on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    Rex Posts: 7

    The first week the Israeli campus is open, Sharp intends to have Price Waterhouse Coopers perform an assessment to see if all of the newly hired staff are actually needed.

     
  • Rex posted at 1:02 pm on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    Rex Posts: 7

    The athletic department is, and has been, paying back the $16 million loan for quite some time now. They make quarterly payments on it.

     
  • obasfirst posted at 12:38 pm on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    obasfirst Posts: 556

    facts are only facts when they are true.

    What facts are you talking about?

     
  • Sabio posted at 11:40 am on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    Sabio Posts: 1228

    Yep, my p.s. is prescient yet again!

     
  • FromAfar posted at 10:48 am on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    FromAfar Posts: 361

    TAMU faculty, including myself, have a lot of collaborations with Israeli researchers. That is not surprising in view of the excellence of research in Israel. TAMU also has some formal agreements with Israeli institutions, the one with the Weizmann Institute being (I think) the most recent.

    I have no interest in teaching in Qatar, but might be interested in teaching a term at TAMU-Israel and interacting with Israeli academics.

    Given the excellence of existing higher education in Israel and the number of underemployed and unemployed academics there, I will be surprised if TAMU can get significant funding from Israel for the operation. The Qatar government generously funds our operation in Qatar.

     
  • obasfirst posted at 10:39 am on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    obasfirst Posts: 556

    why is it good for THE university (A&M)?

    I don't think Israel is a country that needs help with education. They have great, highly ranked, universities there.

    I'm sure has nothing to do with the fact that it is Israel right?

     
  • obasfirst posted at 10:32 am on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    obasfirst Posts: 556

    The thing that strikes you most in the article is the one sentence where they mention that it costs $300 for the request? (although it doesn't make sense to have it there).

    Not the parts of the article that state:

    "The growth of international branch campuses is down ... and most of the new campuses are located in Southeast Asia, as opposed to the Middle East."

    "once you open one, you realize how difficult it actually is, and they tend to be more hesitant to expanding.""

    "it's rare for a university to operate branch campuses in more than one country."

    "overseas expansions typically result in three main concerns for faculty members. ... moral or philosophical qualms ... financial or other resources being diverted abroad .... university to involve faculty in the decision-making process"

    "Texas A&M Faculty Senate Speaker Walter Daugherity said Wednesday that no official input was requested from the faculty senate regarding Israel"

    Those statements don't make you think why A&M wants to open a campus in Israel? The last quote is just to show another example of the BOR's arrogance.

    There is an obvious reason for A&M to be in Quatar; MONEY. I doubt that the Israeli government will be doing a similar thing. So what's the reason to open a satellite campus there? If A&M wants more ties with Israel It would make much more sense to have an extensive collaboration with universities there.


     
  • obasfirst posted at 10:13 am on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    obasfirst Posts: 556

    A lot of faculty go there for a semester or so to get access to pretty much unlimited research money. Plus the higher salary, the free housing, and other benefits of course.

     
  • obasfirst posted at 10:09 am on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    obasfirst Posts: 556

    you mean besides the $5.2 million last year?

    And,
    the $10K in 2011,
    the $4.5 million in 2009,
    the $3.3 million in 2008,
    the $3.8million in 2007,
    the $375K in 2006,
    the $840K in 2005

    Besides that there is just the man hours university officials and staff put in ,etc.

     
  • obasfirst posted at 9:58 am on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    obasfirst Posts: 556

    The only good thing about the Quatar campus is the boatload of potential research money.

     
  • Sabio posted at 9:57 am on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    Sabio Posts: 1228

    Don't confuse rj with the facts.....

     
  • Sabio posted at 9:56 am on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    Sabio Posts: 1228

    non sequitur. The athletic department and the Kyle Field redevelopment project have NOTHING to do with this story.

     
  • citizen1 posted at 9:36 am on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    citizen1 Posts: 210

    Qatar? A kingdom where one family runs the show. 88% of the population are indentured servants. They do have a lot of money though...

     
  • rj posted at 9:33 am on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    rj Posts: 121

    The stadium is paid for in part by my out-of-town clients who never go to it. And gee, if the athletic program is so flush with cash, how about it paying back the 16 million dollar "loan"?

     
  • agnerd posted at 9:17 am on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    agnerd Posts: 502

    A&M has a good thing going in Qatar. I know Qatar is one of the most liberal of the middle east countries, but I hope this doesn't hurt TAMUQ.

     
  • agnerd posted at 9:15 am on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    agnerd Posts: 502

    Nope, academic money doesn't go to the football stadium.

     
  • Sabio posted at 9:11 am on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    Sabio Posts: 1228

    See! Didn't take long!

     
  • Sabio posted at 9:11 am on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    Sabio Posts: 1228

    No need, the stadium is already paid for!

    Besides, if you knew ANYTHING about FOIA request, the entity making the FOIA request is required by law to pay for the costs of gathering the information. I doubt The Eagle would pay for ANYTHING, football or otherwise, at A&M besides the FOIA requests.

     
  • Sabio posted at 9:08 am on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    Sabio Posts: 1228

    Well, now THERE'S a non sequitur! How long did it take for you to create that little world in which John Sharp will rebuild the Temple in Jerusalem?

     
  • Sabio posted at 9:06 am on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    Sabio Posts: 1228

    I have a GREAT life. And THIS is my hobby. Your reaction enhances the enjoyment of my hobby. Thank you!

     
  • jtj posted at 8:23 am on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    jtj Posts: 1

    From my perspective, a free-standing academic undergraduate program makes absolutely no sense! There could be benefits in an association with Israeli universities. However, I can see real advantages to a graduate and research relationship with Israeli institutions and research institutes such as Technicon!

     
  • hoghunter posted at 8:11 am on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    hoghunter Posts: 24

    Good for Chancellor Sharp, The BOR and THE University (A&M). I think it is a wonderful idea to cooperate with and help countries who actually like us and appreciate the support.

     
  • rj posted at 7:35 am on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    rj Posts: 121

    Sab - putting how much the request costs the big school is a preemptive strike against the knee-jerk defenders of everything that Sharp, Perry and the BOR do. After all, that cash could be spent on something important -- like your precious football stadium.

     
  • master of disaster posted at 7:30 am on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    master of disaster Posts: 374

    I've been to the TAMUQ campus, and it has always seemed a bit underutilized. There are some good faculty there, but looks like it functions as an outpost for harboring some of the more controversial administrators until the heat dies down. I guess some of them would rather go to Israel.

     
  • master of disaster posted at 7:27 am on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    master of disaster Posts: 374

    Get a hobby, Sabio. Or a life.

     
  • Sabio posted at 7:20 am on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    Sabio Posts: 1228

    Wow, if The Eagle believes that the cost to The Eagle for compilation of Open Records information is important, why don't they publish how much money it spent on the story entirely? How much of Allen Reed's time was spent on the story, how much does that time cost? How much did it cost to put it in print, or put it on the website? What were the utility costs associated with this story (electricity, phone, email, etc.)?

    A more ridiculous piece of information has never appeared in a news story before. Amazing.

    p.s. Can't wait for the Anti-Israel, Anti-A&M faculty to show up and complain about how bad an idea this is......wait for it.

     
  • citizen1 posted at 7:17 am on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    citizen1 Posts: 210

    Sharp should work to get the College Station campus buses to run on time before working to rebuild the temple in Jerusalem.

     
  • Doris Wellborn posted at 6:42 am on Fri, Oct 11, 2013.

    Doris Wellborn Posts: 117

    "So far, the requests made to A&M will cost the newspaper $300 for officials to compile." Wow. That is actually a lot of records. LIke about a paper box full. We do have a great archeology program at A&M, and of course the Bush School. Maybe agriculture too.

     

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