(TNS)

Tribune News Service

Newsfeatures Budget for Monday, October 7, 2019

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Updated at 4:30 a.m. EDT (0930 UTC).

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Additional news stories appear on the MCT-NEWS-BJT.

This budget is now available at TribuneNewsService.com, with direct links to stories and art. See details at the end of the budget.

^TOP STORIES<

^Talk of reparations for slavery moves to state capitols<

SLAVERY-REPARATIONS:SH — Four centuries after the first African slaves landed on Virginia shores, state lawmakers across the country are taking up the debate over how to atone for what's been called "America's Original Sin."

This year, Democratic lawmakers in California, New York and Vermont — states that either outlawed slavery before the Civil War or never allowed it — have introduced legislation that would apologize for their state's role in slavery; recognize the lasting, negative impact of slavery on current generations of African Americans; and explore monetary reparations.

In April, Democratic lawmakers in Texas introduced a bill urging the passage of a federal reparations bill introduced by U.S. Rep. Sheila Jackson-Lee, also a Democrat, that same month. (Sponsors did not return Stateline calls for comment.) And in September, Florida lawmakers introduced a $10 million reparations bill for the descendants of victims of a specific, 1920 racial atrocity, the Ocoee massacre.

2100 (with trims) by Teresa Wiltz in Washington. MOVED

PHOTO, GRAPHIC

^UNITED STATES<

^A new garden, a sexual assault and the fight at Stanford over Chanel Miller's voice<

^CMP-STANFORD-SEXASSAULT-GARDEN:LA—<In June 2016, a woman known only as Emily Doe read a 12-page single-spaced letter inside a courtroom to the man who had sexually assaulted her behind a dumpster on Stanford's campus more than a year before.

Her statement was published online the following day and quickly emerged as a viral rallying cry for survivors of sexual violence. Now, three years later, her words are at the center of a clash between Stanford students and administrators.

Chanel Miller, who publicly identified herself in September as the 23-year-old who was attacked by Stanford student Brock Turner, came to an agreement with the university: The scene of the crime would be transformed into a garden and marked with a plaque etched with words of Miller's choosing from her victim impact statement.

In the two years since the garden was built, the university has twice rejected the language Miller chose for the plaque, instead offering alternatives she has nixed.

1400 by Colleen Shalby. MOVED

PHOTO

^When masculinity turns 'toxic': A gender profile of mass shootings<

SHOOTINGS-GENDER:KHN — Soon after a 19-year-old man killed three people and wounded more than a dozen at a festival in Gilroy, Calif., in late July, California Gov. Gavin Newsom noted something often taken for granted about mass shootings.

"These shootings overwhelmingly, almost exclusively, are males, boys, 'men' — I put in loose quotes," Newsom said during a news conference. "I do think that is missing in the national conversation."

From January 2013 to August 2019, there were 11 shooting rampages in California in which the perpetrator indiscriminately shot victims in public places and killed three or more people.

Nationwide, there were 53 indiscriminate mass shootings in public areas during that time, and all but three involved male suspects.

850 by Phillip Reese. MOVED

ARCHIVE PHOTO

^Tennessee block grant experiment would boost federal funding, state Medicaid chief says<

TENN-MEDICAID-QA:KHN — Tennessee wants to be the first state to test a radical approach for federal financing of Medicaid, the federal-state health care program for low-income people.

The proposal, Tennessee Medicaid Director Gabe Roberts said, would increase the federal government's contributions by millions of dollars and allow Tennessee to improve care for enrollees, perhaps offering additional services such as limited dental care for some people. But critics fear the plan will harm the poor.

800 by Phil Galewitz. MOVED

PHOTO

^THE WORLD<

^Where contraception's a lifestyle drug not a medical need — so women pay the tab<

GERMANY-CONTRACEPTION:KHN — In the five years she's lived in Germany, Erin Duffy doesn't think she has paid more than 16 euros for medical care. Until now, that is.

Duffy, a 27-year-old American expat in Hamburg, has had an intrauterine device since she was 22. She got it before moving here from Virginia, where her employer-sponsored health insurance covered its entire cost.

Now, she's due for a replacement. And since she receives her health care through the German public insurance program, it's going to cost her 350 euros.

Coverage of birth control highlights a key difference between the U.S. and German health care systems.

1150 (with trims) by Shefali Luthra in Hamburg, Germany. MOVED

PHOTO

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